Florida Gay Married Couple First to Get Green Card Since DOMA Ruling

Posted on Jul 1, 2013 in truthdig.com


Wikimedia Commons

U.S. immigration officials Friday approved the application for permanent residency of Traian Popov, a Bulgarian who had married American partner Julian Marsh in New York last year. Popov, who had relied on student visas to stay in the United States, and Marsh are the first same-sex married couple to have their green card application approved since the Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act last week.

The change in immigration policy since Wednesday’s decision reflects the Obama administration’s support for the ruling, and a desire to quickly adapt national policy to the recognition of gay marriage.

—Posted by Christian Neumeister

The Guardian:

A gay couple from Florida have become the first successful green card applicants for permanent US residency since the supreme court struck down a federal law against same-sex marriage.

Traian Popov, from Bulgaria, and American Julian Marsh learnt the decision from immigration officials on Friday as the government acted quickly to change its visa policies after last week’s legal decision….

Immigration officials have been keeping a list of same-sex couples whose green card petitions were denied in anticipation of the ruling. Those decisions will now be reversed without couples having to present new applications – if no other issues have arisen.

The couple’s case was not the first immigration case to be affected by the Doma ruling. Deportation proceedings against a gay Colombian man were halted by a New York immigration judge just hours after the supreme court decision.

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MAG-Net May 2013 Digital Dialogue: “The Immigrant Rights Movement: Advancing Media and Cultural Strategies”

Submitted by bettyyu on Tue, 2013-06-11 15:09 on mag-net.org

May 1st marks May Day, also known as International Workers Day. On May 1st, 1886, nearly a half a million immigrants went on a general strike to fight for a 8-hour workday. Over a hundred years later, starting in 2006, again millions of immigrant workers and supporters participated in May Day protests against H.R. 4437, a draconian anti-immigrant bill. Even today, the majority of May Day protests are led by immigrants.

Currently, the immigrant rights movement is continuing its fight for comprehensive immigration reform–working to create a pathway to citizenship for many of the 11 million undocumented individuals in this country. At the same time, the corporate media depicts undocumented immigrants as job stealers, lazy welfare cheats, and possible “terrorist” all at the same time. This false narrative not only hurts immigrant communities, it also impacts our ability to move any transformative policy. How can the media justice and immigrant rights movements work together more effectively to uplift the stories of those families most directly impacted by bad legislation, border security and deportations? How are the online and office privacy and rights of immigrants being violated by the U.S. Government?

This Digital Dialogue will bring together organizers, media justice activists, journalists, cultural workers and policy experts who are working to advance a immigrant rights agenda that upholds the dignity, labor and human rights of immigrant communities. On the call we will hear about the various storytelling, media making and cultural strategies to advance this fight.

Featured Speakers:
Laura Muraida, Southwest Workers Union
Aura Bogado, The Nation & Colorlines
Chris Calabrese, American Civil Liberties Union
B. Loewe, National Day Laborers Organizing Network
Celso Mireles, United We Dream

Moderated by: Pedro Joel Espinosa, IDEPSCA & Betty Yu, Center for Media Justice

CALL FOR MAY DAY MEDIA SUBMISSIONS

Deep Dish TV is seeking media submissions (videos, audio recordings, photos, writings) from MAY DAY! We want to hear from you – what current issue do you feel strongly about? Why? What is your hope for change? Email us at deepdish@igc.org to share your art + activism with us!

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Join us tomorrow!!

Join us tomorrow!!

IMMIGRANT, LABOR AND PROGRESSIVE GROUPS SAY: “WE WILL MARCH ON MAY DAY FOR LEGALIZATION, JOBS, & EDUCATION, NOT MONEY FOR BORDER MILITARIZATION”

70,000 people urge New York Times to stop using the dehumanizing and inaccurate term, “illegal”, from news coverage

On Tuesday, April 23, 2013 The Applied Research Center (APC) and The Drop the I-Word Campaign joined with activists, including Fernando Chavez, attorney and eldest son of Cesar Chavez, and Jose Antonio Vargas, award-winning journalist and founder of Define American, to deliver petitions signed by 70,000 people to the New York Times urging them to stop using the term, “illegal” from their news stories when referring to individuals.   Mr. Chavez, Jose Antonio Vargas, the ARC and a coalition of supporters and activists delivered the petitions to Jill Abramson’s office, the executive editor of the NY Times.  The petition was started by Helen Chavez, Fernando Chavez’ mother and widow of Cesar Chavez.

The petitions were delivered only a few weeks after the Associated Press announced their decision to drop the dehumanizing and inaccurate term from describing individuals and would instead only use the word “to refer to an action.”

We feel the term is provocative, dehumanizing, and racially charged.  It is also imprecise and inaccurate.  The term does not take into account the variety of reasons a person is undocumented; many came here legally and have overstayed visas, were brought here as children, or overstayed fleeing persecution.  It creates the stereotyping of a group of individuals, mostly people of color, and centers the immigration debate around border control, when borders are not the issue.  In an interview with Democracy Now’s Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez, Rinku Sen, the ARC’s Executive Director and President, said it best.  It is an “imprecise term that is applied in a blanket way,” and we feel it needs to change.

A few hours after the petitions were delivered, Philip B. Corbett, the associate managing editor for standards, who oversees The Times’ style manual, made an announcement that the Times updated its policies.  Unfortunately, it would continue to use the word “illegal” to describe “someone who enters, lives in or works in the United States without proper legal authorization.” It encourages reporters and editors to “consider alternatives when appropriate to explain the specific circumstances of the person in question, or to focus on actions.”

The AP announcement earlier this month was a victory, and we can only hope that more major news sources, like the New York Times and the LA Times “get with the times” and drop the i-word.

For more information, please visit colorlines.com/droptheiword

Video

Get With The Times, New York Times. Drop The I-Word.

Published on Apr 3, 2013
by http://colorlines.com/droptheiword

“The Associated Press just dropped the term “illegal immigrant” from its stylebook, becoming the newest news outlet to drop dehumanizing language and embrace good journalism. Will the New York Times follow suit?”

Produced by Qualified Laughter: http://qualifiedlaughter.com/

A Conversation on Immigration

A Conversation on Immigration with Jose Antonio Vargas, Cristina Jimenez, Karen Kaminsky, Rinku Sen, & a performance by Iyaba Ibo Mandingo.

This is “an exciting conversation on immigration policy, activism and art in the context of the upcoming election with Define American founder Jose Antonio Vargas, recently featured on the cover of TIME (along with the story of nearly 12 million undocumented Americans), Karen Kaminsky (New York Immigration Coalition Deputy Executive Director), Iyaba Ibo Mandingo (poet/painter/performer), Cristina Jimenez (United We Dream Managing Director), and Rinku Sen (President and Executive Director of the Applied Research Center).” – cultureproject.org/impact-we-people/